Posts by licrois

I like reading, writing stories and music. And I'm a nice person. ;) That's all you need to know!

One-Shot: Heart and Trust

It has been a while since I posted anything to my blog. I am in the middle of restructuring my story and boy, it is a hard work. But I see why it is very important. FYIC story structure is very weak in the middle and I am working on strengthening it. Will end up rewriting it in 3rd person POV too.

Anyway, I wrote this story right after gaining inspiration from a book titled “Pacific Crucible: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-1942” by Ian W. Toll. The story of the Japanese admiral Yamamoto struck a chord within me. I think men become more vulnerable to cheating once they grow powerful because more women start to see past his appearances and more choices became available to him. It is really hard to stay faithful when “better” choice is available. Cheaters, both men and women, could get what they want, but is it really what they want?


Once upon a time there was a woman.

She was not pretty, but a man married her because she looked strong and could take hardships.

They have three children together. Both worked to support the children’s livings. It was tiring to both, but the family was happy.

The woman worked as waitress. Her job was demanding. She came home tired, but always made sure to spend time teaching her children. She also cooked for her husband because he was a military man who rarely came home. Every time they were together again, dinner would be a feast, because there would be no breakfast or lunch. They quenched their loneliness with letters.

Time passed, the man rose in ranks. Eventually he came to a point where he could provide the whole family. The woman quitted her job and only came from time to time whenever the restaurant owner needed extra hands.

All was well until the man met a female host in a bar. They got along immediately like long lost friends. Things never went intimate that night, but gradually, the man’s heart started leaning towards her. He started to come home later, using work as an excuse, in order to visit the female host. He talked more to the female host because she was a great listener to his problems, never offering advises or point out that he was in the wrong like his wife. Moreover, it was not one-sided. The female host also started to adore him, giving him discounts of her service so he could spend more time with her. The woman was kept in the dark, until she saw her husband kissing the female host in the lips in a darkened street.

The woman confronted them.

“Today’s dinner is your favorite. Come home before it goes cold.”

Then she left them before they could say anything to her.

The woman waited. The man came back long after dinner went cold. Neither touched the food while they spoke.

The man wanted a divorce. The woman expected this. Her insecurities came back when she waited. It was obvious that her husband would choose a beautiful woman who looked like she needed to be protected. She knew she was a mother, not a companion her husband wished.

As the husband left, he decided to leave the home for her and their children. The woman laughed bitterly.

“Leave the home to me? We bought this together.”

The husband had nothing to say to that. When he left, the woman finally wept.

Today was the anniversary of their wedding.

With the female host—now his new wife—on his side, the husband’s career shot up. He became the most respected admiral in the nation. He led many battles to victory and secure allies more than diplomats could. Enemy countries fear and respect him at the same time. He was a common face in the newspaper now, along with his beautiful wife. Nobody ever mentioned his first wife—who retook the job as a waiter to support her children. The husband had sent her money, but she always sent it back until he stopped trying.

Ten years passed.

One of the husband’s enemies slandered him. In one night the husband became the enemy of the nation. Both him and his wife was forced to abandon their home to run and hide. Eventually they ran out of places and there was only one place the husband could think of:

His old home.

He and his wife went, prepared to get on their knees to beg, but to their surprise, the woman invited them in before they could say anything. She let them bath, provided them warm food and dry clothes, without any hint of malice in her actions. When they were settled, they asked why she was so kind to them.

The woman thought long before answering,

“I realize I am happier without you. I sleep peacefully now because I don’t need to fear for your life. I can also see you are happier together with her than me.”

“Still, don’t you hate us?”

“At first, yes. But now, you are just a stranger who need help.”

“We will repay you.”

The woman laughed. “You two have taken more than you can give to me—and you cannot return it.

“But I do have three requests. Leave before the children wake up, never come back again, and if you ever regain your power, do not take the children to war.”

That night, the husband felt peace for the first time since forever. He finally realized what he had missed these ten years. He and his new wife never had children together. He caught a glimpse when he passed the children’s shared bedroom and saw four silhouettes. His wife had been pregnant when he left her.

He had to admit with remorse: tonight was the first time in a while that he felt peace. Life without his ex-wife was exciting and more interesting, but he never got any rest. Even with his new wife, he couldn’t help but talk about work because she was such a good listener and talker that he couldn’t help but talk his complains to her. His ex-wife, she listened then made him forget about it once she talked about their children over dinner.

The man took one last look at his children and vowed to fulfill his ex-wife’s requests.

Out of those three, only one left unfulfilled. The husband and his wife were killed three days after their stay on the woman’s house.

The war was over before the children could get drafted. The woman and her children spent the rest of their life in peace.

Announcement

Hi readers! 

I am restructuring this story, so there will be less to no updates for a while—two months at least. I am very sorry for keeping you waiting. I will do my best to deliver an epic story for you all. 

Best regards,

Miss Red Bean

For You I Call – Episode 1: Arachnids Part 2 (3)

Okay, here it is, the promised action chapter! I worked so hard for this, I hope you enjoy it!

Previously:

“Do you want to forget your time as a soldier?” Vert never straight out said if she worked in the army as a soldier, but she left enough hints to deduce.

Vert closes her eyes to allow me cleaning her eyelids. “More than that. I want to forget I am a soldier. I can’t stop wondering if my friends are alright.”

Apprehension dawns upon me. I often catch Vert looking towards the nearby base when we can hear the sounds of battle. It must be torturing her conscience—her enjoying an easy life while her friends are betting their lives out there, close by, every day. If I were her I’d want to forget too.

“I’m sorry.”

Vert doesn’t disagree with me like usual. She keeps silent and still as I finish cleaning up her face. Gradually, a calm and peaceful atmosphere settles between us. Vert seems to enjoy the feeling of rags wiped on her face, eyes closed like a cat being groomed, while I find the simple task of cleaning surprisingly soothing. I can’t help but chuckle at the thought. Dad is right. It takes a little to be happy.

But how much longer can we enjoy this peace?


Continue reading →

For You I Call – Episode 1: Arachnids Part 2 (2)

Hi there, sorry this comes out late. I was not satisfied with it so I make massive corrections on it. I’ll try to be on time on the next one. Hope you all enjoy it! 


Previously:

“Are you fine with it?” 

My question seems to catch Vert off guard.

“Me?”

“You seem to love this place. I’ll feel bad if you keep putting my needs over yours.”

Vert smiles wryly. “There’s no need for you to feel bad. I did what I did because I want to. But you’re right; I don’t want to leave before we actually live in here. Let’s see how it goes first. We can consider moving out if it’s not working for us.”

“That’s—“ another booming sound, “—a good idea,” I manage to say, but my eyes twitch and Vert notices it. She smirks. 

“It seems like you need to get used to the sounds first. Don’t worry. It won’t take long,” she assures, patting my back with an abnormal amount of force. I just laugh along and say nothing. 

I really hope we will be fine, living this close to two threats.

Continue reading →

For You I Call – Episode 1: Arachnids Part 2 (1)

Hello, readers! Here is the start of Arachnids arc Part 2 , where things start to get a “little” exciting. You still get to enjoy two chapters of sibling fluff first though. Ufufufu. Enjoy the ride, and stay tuned for it!


Previously:

“Like I said, I’m not returning you.”

“But why? You’ve got nothing to gain from doing this!”

“It doesn’t matter anymore if I gain or lose,“ Vert says, looking straight to my eyes with unshakable determination. “I just… I’ve promised to myself that I won’t let go so easily.”

Then she lowers her eyes and forces the next words out of her gritted teeth.

“Even if it’s an enemy disguised as a reminder.”

Outside, the whistle is blown and the train departs.


“We’re here,” Vert announces as the coach stops in front of a large gate of steel. The bars are pitch black, one story high, and two coaches wide. Beyond it is a lush forest, which content is unknown despite my ability to see clearly in the dark.

“Is this a—” I pause to find the right word, “—park?”

“No. This is my home.”

“Home? But I don’t see any building.” There’s only the high walls, the road, and the forest. We’re so far from the nearest town that it’s amazing to see a road built sturdy enough to let a coach pass.

“Of course you don’t see it. It’s hidden behind these trees. Come on. Let’s get off so Rosalys can return the coach.”

“And let her walk all the way back here?”

“Pffft. Of course not. She got to rent a horse until we got our own.”

I accept the explanation and force myself to get off. It’s actually easier than I thought. I guess after all those close calls and long journey, I am simply too tired to feel scared.

I’m still not convinced there’s a building beyond the trees though. My skepticism only increases as we walk through the lush of greens. The path is unkempt. Mini plants grow between the stone blocks and dead leaves cover most of it. It looks more like the opening of a hiking trail.

Vert sighs when she squishes another mud patch.

“This will be hell to clean up.”

I hum in agreement. Leave it any longer and the path will be reclaimed by the forest. I’m almost afraid to find out the state of the building—if it exists.

“We are halfway there,” Vert announces when we are approaching a sharp turn to the right. “You should be able to see it after this turn.”

And there it is, perfectly visible from the path, a huge white mansion with ebony colored roof. It’s higher than the trees, which is already two stories high, and looks even bigger up close; like four three stories high, ten cars wide building lined up and glued together. The windows are as high as the gate and the main entrance is decorated with white pillars. There’s even a pond with a grand fountain in front of it. I just have to stop and stare.

Oh. Wow.

“Isn’t this a little…”

“Overdone? I agree, but it was on discount. The garden is large too, so why not?”

“You call this—“ I gesture to the whole area, “—a garden? Have you thought about maintenance? Even a mansion a quarter as big as this needs ten people to maintain,” I say, speaking from my experience visiting Azure’s house. I take another look and feel tired just from imagining how much work needed to take care all of this.

“Of course I did. We can just seal the rooms we don’t need. As for the garden, I’ll take care of it. I’m planning to open an herb store.”

“A herb store? But what about your job in the army?”

“I quit weeks ago.”

“And they just allow you?”

“It’s before I kidnap you and I do have a proper reason. My injury prevents me from working in the army.”

“But…” I give Vert a once over. “You look fine.”

“That’s because it’s already healed. But I can’t do anything too strenuous for a long time.”

Considering she can lift me easily and land noiselessly from a three story jump, I wonder what her definition of strenuous is.

“I see. Then gardening should be fine for you.”

“Right. Besides, it’s not like I’m starting from zero. This whole garden is already filled with rare and precious herbs; naturally grown without any involvement from human hands. The soil is already so fertile and this place is close to the Bright Spring—the most nutritious water source in the queendom if you don’t know. The only thing left to do is keeping the weeds and pests from eating too much of the good herbs.”

”That’s good to hear. But if the location is that good, why was it sold cheap?”

“Because it’s too close to the border. Nobody wants to live in a place where you can hear the sounds of battle.”

As if on cue, several booming sounds reach my ears. Like Vert said, they sound close—like someone sounding large drums behind the forest. It’s definitely a worrying sound, but Vert looks unaffected, just like that time with the dragon.

“Are we really going to be fine?” I ask to make sure. The booming sounds continue, each sounds closer than the one before.

“More than fine. No one will expect you and your kidnapper to live so close to the border, where the army’s presence is at its peak. Also, didn’t I mention that the Bright Spring is nearby? That spring is highly protected because it is one of this country’s lifelines. In other words, this is practically the safest place we can stay.”

“But still…”

“If you’re that worried, we can move out,” Vert says, so easily that I doubt it.

“Can we?”

Vert nods. “I can sell this mansion again and use the money to buy another home further from the border.”

I’m glad to hear it, but even if she doesn’t show it, I can sense her reluctance.

“Are you fine with it?”

My question seems to catch Vert off guard.

“Me?”

“You seem to love this place. I’ll feel bad if you keep putting my needs over yours.”

Vert smiles wryly. “There’s no need for you to feel bad. I did what I did because I want to. But you’re right; I don’t want to leave before we actually live in here. Let’s see how it goes first. We can consider moving out if it’s not working for us.”

“That’s—“ another booming sound, “—a good idea,” I manage to say, but my eyes twitch and Vert notices it. She smirks.

“It seems like you need to get used to the sounds first. Don’t worry. It won’t take long,” she assures, patting my back with an abnormal amount of force. I just laugh along and say nothing.

I really hope we will be fine, living this close to two threats.


PS: If it’s hard for you to imagine the mansion, just look at the US Capitol building. It was based on it.

For You I Call – Episode 1: Arachnids Part 1 (8)

Happy New Year! I’m back from holidays! Hope you all had good ones! Here’s the other part for your Monday reading pleasure!


Previously:

“If they’re that concerned, why send the army too? Don’t you have it under control?”

“To keep the creature in line in case it goes berserk of course. Groundsweepers may appear calm, but they’re actually very sensitive. If they accidentally acknowledged a city as an enemy because some idiot provokes it, then, well, it’s hard to change its mind.”

I look at the dragon again. It’s blinking again, so slowly. Yeah. I think it can flatten a city or two before it can be convinced otherwise.

“Long story short, moving a Groundsweeper takes months of planning and calculation. You can’t just plus one when you feel like it. Even if you’re desperate.”

“Perhaps they have no other choice,” I say, trying to make sense of the reason behind. 

“That’s what I’m afraid of. In any case, this works for us. It’ll take around three to four hours to let the dragons pass. The checkpoint will be lax with the growing line.”

“And the patrols?”

“Won’t come. They trust the checkpoint guard to do their job.”


True to her words, we pass the checkpoint without trouble. We are not even stopped; the guards have given up checking when our turn comes. But Vert doesn’t relax until we can’t see the town anymore.

“I’m going to sleep,” Vert announces before laying down and continues sleeping. I too, follow her example when I get bored of the sceneries. When I wake up, Vert is the one driving.

“Oh, you’re awake,” Vert says when they stop in the middle of a road.

“Is there any trouble?” I ask.

“No, I’m just here to wake Rosalys up. We’re close to the town; it’ll be too suspicious if a noblewoman drives her own coach.”

Rosalys wakes and we’re moving again. It doesn’t even take ten minutes to reach the town. The maid drops us at the station before departing again to return the coach.

“Doesn’t she need to go back to the town where we rent it?” I can’t help but ask.

“Of course not. You can return the coach to the nearest postal service.”

Ah, so it’s like a chain service shop. “I see.”

“How about your eyes? Can you still see?”

“It’s getting difficult. Is it morning already?”

“Soon. Hold my hand. We’re going to purchase the tickets and wait for Rosalys.”

Turns out we don’t have to wait. Rosalys is already back when we finish buying the tickets. The train, which I’m lucky enough to see, is already on standby, so we get on right away. The inside is dim lighted, so it’s not very hard to navigate through. But when we enter the compartment, it’s total darkness.

“Hold on, let me fix the light for you,” Vert says after Rosalys excuses herself and heads to her own compartment. She lets go of my hand and work on the room’s lighting. When I can see again, the compartment’s window is closed with a blind, with some light peeking through its edges.

“How is it now?” she asks.

“Better,” I say, taking a seat to show the proof. Vert sits on the opposite side and stares at me intently.

“So, have you thought about what you’re going to do next?” she asks.

“I have, during our ride on the coach. But I still don’t know what to do.”

“There’s probably not much you can do in the first place. Not when the army is looking for you.”

“Why are they looking for me in the first place?”

Vert looks like she’s debating with herself before answering.

“Because I stole you from them.”

“Stole me? You mean to say I’m the army’s property?”

“Not originally. The army took you into custody and I bust you out.”

I suspect it’s not that simple, but I’ll let it slide for a more important question for now.

“Why did they take me? What did I do?” I ask, starting to fear what my lost memories hide from me. What if I did something bad? What if I killed people?

“You didn’t do anything. It’s just, the circumstances you were found weren’t good, so they think—” Vert stops, once more looking like she’s debating with herself, then looks down. “Sorry, I can’t explain more than that.”

And there’s nothing I can do to change her mind. Not if she’s as stubborn as the Vert I know. So I do as I usually do; asking in a roundabout way, in yes/no format.

“Does it have something to do with the war you’re having?”

Vert goes rigid; her lips pursed tight from trying too much in keeping a poker face. She really is like the Vert I know: bad at lying. Then this shouldn’t be too difficult.

“Do they see me as a threat?”

Vert looks away.

“You know, right? Because you work in the army.”

“Can you please stop that?” Vert snaps. “Continue doing that, and the army will think I’m leaking the information to the enemy. The less you know, the better for both of us.”

I open my mouth, then close it again.

“I’m sorry.”

“Stop that.”

“Stop what?”

“Stop imitating my brother.”

“I’m not imitating him.”

“Yes you do.”

“No.”

“Yes.”

“No.”

“Yes.”

“No.”

“Yes.”

“No.”

“Yes.”

“N—“

“Argh! This is why I told you to stop! We’re reminders of our long gone siblings! How could you act like you’re not bothered by it?”

I chuckle. “Not really. I’m not even sure if my Vert really died. Besides, it’s not that hard for me to disassociate you from her; my sister is a lot cuter.”

Vert gives me a very judgmental look. I shrug it off.

“It’s true.”

Vert huffs. “Whatever. I better stop talking to you before I start treating you like my own brother.”

“Fine by me. It’s probably for the best.”

Vert glares at me.

“I’m not going to return you to the army,” she says like it’s an oath.

“You better do. I’m not your brother and I’m distressing you with my similarities to him. Even if I’m not your enemy, I can only live in hiding and burdening you. It’ll save you a lot of trouble if you just return me and pretend that you’re the one who captured me back.”

I can see Vert’s determination wavers.

Outside, the station staff makes an announcement.

“The first express bound to Vairfield town will soon depart. Passengers are requested to board. I repeat: the first express bound to Vairfield…”

“Hurry up. The train is leaving,” I urge. Because the further we are from the town we escaped from, the more difficult it’ll be to justify Vert’s involvement. But my words seem to produce the opposite effect. Vert’s eyes hardens with determination.

“Like I said, I’m not returning you.”

“But why? You’ve got nothing to gain from doing this!”

“It doesn’t matter anymore if I gain or lose,“ Vert says, looking straight to my eyes with unshakable determination. “I just… I’ve promised to myself that I won’t let go so easily.”

Then she lowers her eyes and forces the next words out of her gritted teeth.

“Even if it’s an enemy disguised as a reminder.”

Outside, the whistle is blown and the train departs.

For You I Call – Episode 1: Arachnids Part 1(7)

Previously:

I take a seat across Vert, who sits right behind the driver side. Once I’m seated, she closes the door and orders Rosalys to go.

“You can go now.”

“Yes, lady Vert.”

Rosalys ring a bell, and the coach moves, accompanied with the pegasuses snort and flap of wings. Nobody stops us from leaving the inn


“We will take the main road and head to the north. On the next town, we will use the train to head south east, where my home is,” Vert says, continuing her explanation from before. “There will be a checkpoint, of course, but it should be fine with our disguise.”

“Won’t they know my face?”

“I doubt it. It’s easier to tell people to look for a white haired young man than distribute a portrait they may have or not have. Besides, you look very different from when I found you. Nobody would recognize you—not immediately.”

“That’s a relief. What should I do at the checkpoint?”

“Just play as a visually challenged nobleman who has a really sore throat; let me and Rosalys handle the conversation.”

Visually challenged. That’s one way of putting it. In other words, sit tight and don’t do anything. Simple enough.

“Speaking of visions, your sight has come back, right?”

“Yes, but it’s a little bit dark. I can’t see very well.”

“Maybe you need more light. Hold on, let me turn up the lantern.”

Vert leans sideways to reach the lantern placed on a small plank fastened between the seats. She turns the knob, and the room becomes much darker.

“Vert, you got it wrong. You made it darker,” I say when Vert makes no attempt to fix it.

“No, I didn’t. I made it brighter.”

“But it’s darker for me,” I say, earning a frown from Vert.

“Perhaps…” Vert reaches the knob again and turns it to the opposite direction.

“How’s this?”

“Better.”

Vert turns the knob further.

“And this?”

“Much better. I can see very well now.”

“And I can’t. I think I know what’s wrong with your eyes now. They’re weak to light.”

“So I can see when it’s dark, but not when it’s bright?”

“Yes. That’s probably why you can suddenly see. It’s night now. When you woke up, it was noon and the room was bright from sunlight.”

“I see.” It’s a good news, but troubling. How am I supposed to do activities on daytime? It’s not like I can turn off the sun.

Wait.

That’s it!

“I need sunglasses.”

“Sunglasses? What’s that?”

She doesn’t even know sunglasses? On what century is this place?

“Glasses with dark lenses. Lenses are plates of small glass that you can wear on your eyes.”

“I know what glasses are,” Vert says with a huff. “I just don’t know what sunglasses are. But it’s a good idea. Perhaps we can fashion one at a glasses shop.”

“Yes.” I hope it won’t be like grandpa Cor’s round and old fashioned glasses. The lenses are too big and he looks like a mad doctor when he wears it.

The conversation ends there. Vert adjusts the light so both of us can see. After that, it’s silence between us.

It makes me think. Now that the hectic-ness subsides, questions surface in my mind. Where am I? Somewhere far away from home, that’s clear. But where—or when—exactly? The past? No way, they have pegasuses and back at home pegasuses are only a fantasy creature. Another world? Most likely, since there’s another Vert and another me here. But how did I get here? And why there are people looking for me?

Or maybe the explanation is much simpler; I am still sleeping and this is all just a dream. But no. This is too lucid to be a dream. There’s no way I can replicate the sensation of riding a coach in my dream—because I’ve never rode one—and there’s no way I can imagine Vert’s adult version face in this much detail.

Speaking of Vert…

I sneak a glance at her. She has closed her eyes and appears to be taking a nap. Now that she relaxes, she looks even more like the Vert I know. She still has some baby fat left and only now I notice how stern and mature she looks when she’s awake. Now, she looks like an ordinary girl sleeping.

And I’m disillusioned with how she looks in her dress. Sure, she’s wearing a cream colored, long sleeved blouse paired with a green, two layer skirt and black high-heeled boots, but she does not look feminine at all. It’s like I’m looking at a pretty boy dressing up as a girl. How did she manage pulling that off? Is it the boots? The short hair? Her face? Or is it the way she crosses both arms and legs?

Vert opens her eyes. They’re green like pine’s leaves.

“What is it?”

“Nothing. I just thought you really look like Vert—my sister, I mean, you look better with pants.” I lie straight away.

Vert sniggers. “And you too, like my brother’s long lost twin.”

Boy, does this Vert eats my lie raw too?

“By the way, what’s your name?”

“…You’ve been calling me brother and only now ask my name?” I ask incredulously.

Vert shrugs. “It just occurred to me that you may share the same looks, but not necessarily the same name.”

“Right. It’s Argent. Same with your brother?”

Vert sighs. “Yes. Why you’re not my brother again?”

That question is rhetorical, but I answer it anyway.

“Because we think memories and blood ties are necessary to be brother and sister.”

Vert goes still. No wonder, even I’m surprised by myself.

“Are you saying that we can pretend to be brother and sister if we want?” Vert asks, voice tight.

“Yes. Not as a replacement for each other though,” I quickly say.

“Sounds interesting, but I’ll have to think about that.”

“Me too.”

“Why you too? You’re the one who suggested it.”

“Yes, but on the spur of the moment. I need to prepare my heart to handle another Vert in my life,” I say, half serious half joking, which earns me a raised eyebrow from Vert.

“Surely my counterpart is not that bad.”

“She’s a dirt magnet. Everyday she comes back as if she has rolled a hundred times on the ground and thousand times on the mud.”

“Oh, then I’m as bad.”

I want ask what that means, but I notice the coach slows down to a stop.

“Checkpoint time?”

Vert peeks through the curtain and shakes her head.

“No. It should be further down the road. Rosalys? What’s wrong?”

“There’s a huge line in front of us, lady Vert. I have yet to know what is wrong though.”

“Can you see the front?”

“No, milady. It’s too dark. Please wait for a moment; I will inquire what’s wrong.”

Rosalys comes back a minute later.

“The army is sending reinforcements to north-east defense line. The road is closed to allow them to come through.”

“The reinforcements should be taxied by the pegasus riders. What do they need the main road for?”

Vert’s question is answered by a tremor.

“…oh, right. I forgot. There’s that.”

“What do you mean by that?”

“Why don’t you look outside? It’ll soon pass.”

Another tremor. I lift the curtain and look forward. At first I only see other coaches, pulled to a stop for the same reason. Then the sky shifts.

No. It’s not the sky. It’s a lizard. A giant, around thirty stories high and several blocks long freakishly over-sized lizard. Its torso is shaped like a round bread, but its skin is like cone shaped rocks put together, especially on the back. Its tail is short; only half of its torso’s length, but its end is shaped like a club—with spikes. Its head is like a turtle’s but with scales and two short horns.

I close the curtain and face Vert.

“What is that?”

“A stone dragon called Groundsweeper. Cute, isn’t it?”

I look at the lizard again. Yeah, it’s cute; if it was palm sized and weighed several hundred grams instead of several hundred tons.

“And you’re saying that that overgrown lizard is the reinforcements.”

“Nah, that one is the reinforcements’ weapon of mass-destruction. The real reinforcements are the army escorting it. You can only see the pegasus corps from here though.”

Vert is right. There are tenths of pegasuses flying alongside the dragon. Some maintain their altitude close to the dragon’s head, wings flapping only once or twice as they glide beside its unblinking eyes.

“Amazing. How do you put something that big under control?”

Vert hands me a spyglass. “Here. Look at the top of its head, between the horns.”

I do as instructed. I see several uniformed people riding on their pegasuses before I find the spot mentioned. There are silhouettes, people sitting in a circle between the horns.

“See those people? They’re its summoners; the only ones who can give command to it and bring it under control.”

“If it’s a summoned being, why make it walk? Why don’t you just summon it on the battlefield?”

“It’s not that simple. To summon a grand class familiar like Groundsweeper, you need years of preparation and tremendous amount of resources, so you can’t just dismiss and re-summon it as you like. Of course they summoned it near the battlefield where it’s stationed. But now they’re being moved because there’s another battlefield that needs its assistance and they can’t wait for years.”

The noise grows outside as Vert explains the situation. People are getting off their coaches to see the dragon better. There are ‘ooooh’s and ‘aaah’s accompanied with excited finger pointing; a complete opposite to Vert, who isn’t fazed by the sheer scale and grandiose of the dragon. She just stares at another direction, looking concerned.

“What’s wrong?” I ask.

“It’s strange,” I give Vert a questioning look, and she elaborates. “The Groundsweepers are the west Ulrika base’s familiar. I heard they’re planning to send one to the northeast Geneche base, but I see two.”

“Two?” I look out again and yeah, there’s another Groundsweeper, quite far behind the first one. There are less pegasuses around it. “What’s wrong with two?”

“Think about it. How much resources and time will it take to move a creature of this scale across the country? The answer is two battalions of combined corps and three weeks. That means for three weeks, the whole border defense is one familiar and two battalions short. Anything can happen within that span of time.”

“If they’re that concerned, why send the army too? Don’t you have it under control?”

“To keep the creature in line in case it goes berserk of course. Groundsweepers may appear calm, but they’re actually very sensitive. If they accidentally acknowledged a city as an enemy because some idiot provokes it, then, well, it’s hard to change its mind.”

I look at the dragon again. It’s blinking again, so slowly. Yeah. I think it can flatten a city or two before it can be convinced otherwise.

“Long story short, moving a Groundsweeper takes months of planning and calculation. You can’t just plus one when you feel like it. Even if you’re desperate.”

“Perhaps they have no other choice,” I say, trying to make sense of the reason behind.

“That’s what I’m afraid of. In any case, this works for us. It’ll take around three to four hours to let the dragons pass. The checkpoint will be lax with the growing line.”

“And the patrols?”

“Won’t come. They trust the checkpoint guard to do their job.”